Press/Reviews

Acoustic Peacock review April 2012

Review:  April 13th   The Fiddle Chicks  with support Melody Feder at the Acoustic Peacock

Much has been written about the 
Fiddle Chicks – check out the bio on their website – but I think we are going to read lots more as time goes by.  I wonder whether the duo is the most demanding composition for performing groups, especially where the two performers take equal share of the stage and all aspects of performance – playing, singing and connecting with audience, and importantly, connecting with each other.  We have seen it work so well with the Yearlings,  Andy and Marta, and again with Emma and Dee.   And so what is it about the Fiddle Chicks that engenders such warm and enthusiastic responses from their audiences?

On Friday through no fault of anyone in particular, plugs and leads and all those wondrous things that most of us plebs are in fear of, decided to take Friday the 13th seriously and worked to undermine the great work our replacement sound man, Barry, had been doing. Sound men and women as opposed to unsound men and women, know that these things happen for no apparent reason and then they suddenly work as if the music gods have decided to stop playing games.  And through it all the chicks with the fiddles smiled, did all their checking and testing with their mind boggling array of plugs, switches, whizz bangs and boxes and things – and proceeded to set about showing us all why they are so good.  This was a sublime performance.  It’s the duo thing done really well.  Apart from the level of expertise, and I’m talking here not only about the brilliance of the fiddle playing, but also Dee’s distinctive syrupy lead vocals and Emma’s tight as a drum harmonies (while playing which amazes me), the two performers relate to their audience.  The thing too about original music is that heard often enough, it becomes a standard and you recognise it and you look forward to hearing it again.  It’s something that those who only want to hear covers miss out on.

Dave Greenslade

Rip it Up Magazine

Au Bonheur des Dames (The Ladies Paradise)

Mercury Cinema, Sun Feb 26

A collaboration of all things 1930s, Au Bonheur des Dames is a French silent film experience with a difference, with live music based on the original score and a half-time vintage fashion show part of the fun. The film focuses on new department store Au Bonheur des Dames (The Ladies Paradise) and its proprietor's aims to crush the little guy in the name of progress. The social commentary remains relevant today, with additional elements of comedy, romance and melodrama thrown in for good measure. The vigorous musicianship of the Fiddle Chicks duo creates a compelling atmosphere, while the fashion show- including original work by local designer Waratah Kaloo of Yogini Streetwear- and a free glass of wine on arrival were thoughtful touches. There are even prizes for dressing up, although this is not compulsory. All in all, a fun evening to share with friends.

Final word: Belle!

Jenny Roesler

Au Bonheur des Dames continues at Mercury Cinema until Thu Mar 15.

Acoustic Peacock review Sep 2011

 

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"Emma and Dee were in scintillating form.  Their fiddle playing was breathtakingly beautiful.  They are very clever.  They can effortlessly shift the mood, taking the audience with them – from the romantic to the dramatic; from traditional style to contemporary.  And they can sing too.." Acoustic Peacock review sep 2011

Messenger Press

Talent is no fret

 

USING their violins and voices to
dazzle audiences near and far,
The Fiddle Chicks are now ready
to settle in the south for a performance
at the Acoustic Peacock
in September. Reporter SOPHIE
PERRI spoke to band member
Dee Trewartha about the story of
The Fiddle Chicks.
What is your sound like?
The Fiddle Chicks’ sound is fairly
unique; two chicks (Trewartha
and Emma Luker), two fiddles,
two stomp boxes and two voices
combined with two digital-effects
units for added colour gives a
very full acoustic, rhythmic and
unusual sound. A bit folky, a
bit trad, a bit bluesy and quite
original.
What were the struggles you had
when you were first starting?
A typical band has guitars and
often drums to keep the pitch and
the tempo at a constant. When we
began trying to play and sing with
fretless melody instruments, we
were not used to it and it was an
inspiring challenge to get the
whole thing working.
Are there many other musical
groups like The Fiddle Chicks in
Adelaide?
There doesn’t seem to be another
band like The Fiddle Chicks anywhere.
Fiddles are generally a
melodic instrument and as such
aren’t usually the basis of a band,
especially used with vocals. As far
as we know, we are unique.
What have been the highlights for
the band?
Playing Australia’s larger music
f e s t i v a l s l i k e Woodford,
Fairbridge and the National Folk
Festival has been terrific, visiting
different parts of the country including
regional South Australia
and most recently selling our first
digital downloads on CDBaby
and iTunes.
The band has done many children’s
concerts. How do children
respond to your music?
Children generally seem to love
the stories and energy behind our
music, not to mention the chance
to dance and stomp and get involved.
We have done a lot of
children’s concerts and workshops
over the years, most recently
in Roxby Downs a couple
of weeks ago, and we have quite
a few small fiddle playing fans
who like to come to our shows and
come up for a chat afterwards.

USING their violins and voices todazzle audiences near and far,The Fiddle Chicks are now ready to settle in the south for a performance at the Acoustic Peacock in September. Reporter SOPHIE PERRI spoke to band member Dee Trewartha about the story of The Fiddle Chicks. What is your sound like? The Fiddle Chicks’ sound is fairlyunique; two chicks (Trewarthaand Emma Luker), two fiddles, two stomp boxes and two voices combined with two digital-effects units for added colour gives a very full acoustic, rhythmic and unusual sound. A bit folky, abit trad, a bit bluesy and quite original.What were the struggles you had when you were first starting? A typical band has guitars and often drums to keep the pitch and the tempo at a constant. When we began trying to play and sing with fretless melody instruments, we were not used to it and it was an inspiring challenge to get the whole thing working. Are there many other musical groups like The Fiddle Chicks in Adelaide? There doesn’t seem to be another band like The Fiddle Chicks anywhere. Fiddles are generally a melodic instrument and as such aren’t usually the basis of a band,especially used with vocals. As far as we know, we are unique. What have been the highlights for the band? Playing Australia’s larger music festivals like Woodford, Fairbridge and the National Folk Festival has been terrific, visiting different parts of the country including regional South Australiaand most recently selling our first digital downloads on CDBabyand iTunes. The band has done many children’s concerts. How do children respond to your music? Children generally seem to love the stories and energy behind our music, not to mention the chance to dance and stomp and get involved. We have done a lot of children’s concerts and workshops over the years, most recently in Roxby Downs a couple of weeks ago, and we have quite a few small fiddle playing fans who like to come to our shows and come up for a chat afterwards. What do you think is so special about the violin? The violin is still built to a very old design with the same materials and hand-crafted pegs and body parts, so has a mystique of tradition. Violins can often be one or two centuries old.

 

The Fiddle Chicks play the Acoustic Peacock, Lot 80,

Norman Rd, Willunga, on Friday, September 9, at 7.30pm. Cost:

$20 adult, $15 concession. Inquiries: Dave on 0405 130 910.

 

http://digitaledition.southerntimes.com.au/default.aspx?iid=52296&startpage=page0000037

ampersandduck blogspot

Today's festival highlights (I forgot to take my phone, so couldn't twitter my fun):

A duo called Bygone Errors,

Watching the Fiddle Chicks play a superb rendition of Frankenfurter's song 'I'm Going Home' in the Infinite Rocky Horror tribute heat. It had deep shades of Ultravox's 'Vienna'. The Rocky Horror theme isn't working very well this year. It's hard to camp up something already so campy, and straight or soulful renditions don't work that well either. Most of the acts are playing 'There's a Light (Over at the Frankenfurt place)', which, I've worked out, is because it has the most life-affirming hippy lyrics (There's a light // in the darkness // of everybody's life). Blech.

But the Fiddle Chicks made it work.

http://ampersandduck.blogspot.com/2011/04/easter-day-2.html

Rip It Up

 

Adventures Of The HMS Brucie
Adelaide Fringe Festival Cabaret Show
Nexus Cabaret, Sun Feb 20, 2011
‘All aboard, all aboard the HMS Brucie. Come sail with us on the seven
seas. Pirates, Gypsies and vagabonds welcome, leave your landlubber legs
behind’. Be prepared to be taken on this extraordinary adventure with
these exceptional fiddle-playing chicks. Including old world songs from the
Black Sea to the story of Matthew Flinders mapping of South Australia,
these are heartfelt songs of love, longing, of love lost and new-found
lands.
The Fiddle Chicks sent chills down my spine with their mesmerising fiddle
playing, stomp box percussion and beautiful two-part harmonies. They
draw you in from the first moment and take you on the wildest trip across
the seven seas. They showcase some of the richness and heritage of folk
music from around the world. The Fiddle Chicks are not to be missed, their
superb arrangements and magical playing makes this one amazing show.
Final word: Mesmerising.
Edel Perth & Kathryn Barclay
Rip It Up Magazine

Adventures Of The HMS BrucieAdelaide Fringe Festival Cabaret Show

Nexus Cabaret, Sun Feb 20, 2011

‘All aboard, all aboard the HMS Brucie. Come sail with us on the sevenseas. Pirates, Gypsies and vagabonds welcome, leave your landlubber legsbehind’. Be prepared to be taken on this extraordinary adventure withthese exceptional fiddle-playing chicks. Including old world songs from theBlack Sea to the story of Matthew Flinders mapping of South Australia,these are heartfelt songs of love, longing, of love lost and new-foundlands.The Fiddle Chicks sent chills down my spine with their mesmerising fiddleplaying, stomp box percussion and beautiful two-part harmonies. Theydraw you in from the first moment and take you on the wildest trip acrossthe seven seas. They showcase some of the richness and heritage of folkmusic from around the world. The Fiddle Chicks are not to be missed, theirsuperb arrangements and magical playing makes this one amazing show.

Final word: Mesmerising.Edel Perth & Kathryn Barclay Rip It Up Magazine

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